fda-limits-use-of-johnson-johnson-vaccine-to-certain-individuals-age-18-and-older

FDA Limits Use of Johnson & Johnson ‘Vaccine’ to ‘Certain Individuals’ Age 18 and Older


Due to concerns with the risk of thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS), the FDA is limiting the authorized use of the Johnson & Johnson (J&J) COVID-19 “vaccine” to individuals 18 years of age and older for whom other authorized “vaccines” are not accessible.


In a May 5, 2022 press release the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it “has limited the authorized use of the [Johnson & Johnson] COVID-19 Vaccine to individuals 18 years of age and older for whom other authorized or approved COVID-19 vaccines are not accessible or clinically appropriate, and to individuals 18 years of age and older who elect to receive the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine because they would otherwise not receive a COVID-19 vaccine.”

The agency says it’s limiting the use of the advenovirus-vector “vaccine” because it has “determined that the risk of thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS), a syndrome of rare and potentially life-threatening blood clots in combination with low levels of blood platelets with onset of symptoms approximately one to two weeks following administration of the [J&J] COVID-19 Vaccine, warrants limiting the authorized use of the vaccine.”

The FDA goes on to note that it has:

“determined that the known and potential benefits of the vaccine for the prevention of COVID-19 outweigh the known and potential risks for individuals 18 years of age and older for whom other authorized or approved COVID-19 vaccines are not accessible or clinically appropriate, and for individuals 18 years of age and older who elect to receive the [J&J] COVID-19 Vaccine because they would otherwise not receive a COVID-19 vaccine.”

Although the FDA does not note this outright, there is a robust and growing body of evidence linking both the advenovirus-vector “vaccines” (such as the one from AstraZeneca, along with the one from J&J) as well as the mRNA “vaccines” (i.e. the Moderna and Pfizer injections) to serious blood clotting issues. Indeed, Paul Offit, professor of pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, noted in a YouTube video on July 14, 2021 that “serious blood clots… seem to occur in roughly one person per 500,000 that get the [J&J] vaccine. The blood clots are serious because they can involve the spleen, they can involve areas of the intestine, and they can involve the brain.”

Since Offit’s July, 2021 statement, the evidence the COVID-19 “vaccines” lead to thrombosis—that is, the formation or presence of a blood clot within a blood vessel—and Thrombocytopenia—a condition caused by a low blood platelet count—has been overwhelming. One study published in the Journal of Current Science and Technology in January of 2022, for example, noted that “Despite its solid ability to stimulate immunity with high efficiency and efficacy, a surge in female fatalities following administrations of the… adenovector vaccines [has]… occurred.” The authors added “Published articles regarding both hypothesised mechanisms as well as recorded incidences of this rare vaccine-induced blood clots, also known as the Thrombosis and Thrombocytopenia Syndrome (TTS), have [also] been discussed.”

Indeed, the FDA itself paused the rollout of the J&J “vaccine” in early 2021 after the administration received “reports of six cases of a rare and severe type of blood clot in individuals following administration” of the injections.

“We recognize that the [J&J] COVID-19 Vaccine still has a role in the current pandemic response in the United States and across the global community. Our action reflects our updated analysis of the risk of TTS following administration of this vaccine and limits the use of the vaccine to certain individuals,” Peter Marks, director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, said in the FDA’s press release. “Our action reflects our updated analysis of the risk of TTS following administration of this vaccine and limits the use of the vaccine to certain individuals,” Marks added.

Cross-sectional image of a deep-vein thrombosis. Image: Patho

The FDA notes the agency “assessed reports submitted to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), reviewed the medical literature and considered the information from global regulatory partners about thrombosis with thrombocytopenia that have been reported following use of a similar, yet not identical, COVID-19 vaccine[s]…” to come to its new guidance. As of the release date of the FDA’s press statement, “a total of 15 cases of TTS have been reported to VAERS,” and occurred in women between the ages of 18 and 59; with a median age of 37 years old.

Regardless of who decides to take the J&J “vaccine,” the FDA notes clearly in its fact sheet for healthcare providers that the injection is still only available under emergency use authorization (EUA). The FDA has not actually approved the J&J injection for use in anybody, nor has the agency actually approved literally any of the other “vaccines” currently available to the public.


Feature image: New York National Guard

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