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Peer-Reviewed Study Finds COVID-19 ‘Vaccines’ Cause Increase in Shingles Incidence


A new study published in the peer-reviewed Journal of The European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology has found the COVID-19 “vaccines” increase recipients’ risk of Herpes Zoster (a.k.a. shingles) by nearly 100% 60 days after injection.


A new study published in the peer-reviewed Journal of The European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology has found the COVID-19 “vaccines” increase recipients’ risk of Herpes Zoster (a.k.a. shingles) by nearly 100% 60 days after injection. The authors of the study, including Moritz Hertel in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University of Berlin, et al. compared more than 1,000,000 “unvaccinated” people to 1,000,000 people “vaccinated with the COVID-19 “vaccines” and found the rate of Herpes Zoster (HZ) was nearly twice as high in the latter cohort than it was in the former one.

The initial cohorts for the study included 1,095,086 vaccinated and 16,966,018 unvaccinated patients searched on “theTriNetX” database—a company that maintains an enormous trove of patients’ medical information—and were matched on age and gender in order to mitigate confounder bias. After matching, the authors maintained just as many vaccinated as unvaccinated (1,095,086) people from each group.

Herpes Zoster. Image: Gzzz

Moritz and the other authors write that:

“After matching, each cohort accounted for 1,095,086 patients. For the vaccinated group (Cohort I), 2,204 subjects developed HZ within 60 days of COVID-19 vaccination, while among Cohort II, 1,223 patients were diagnosed with HZ within 60 days after having visited the clinic for any other reason (i.e. not vaccination). The risk of developing shingles was calculated as 0.20% and 0.11% for cohort I and cohort II, respectively. The difference was statistically highly significant (P<0.0001; log-rank test). The risk ratio and odds ratio were 1.802 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.680; 1.932)and 1.804 (95% CI=1.682; 1.934).”

The authors hypothesize at the study’s outset that the COVID-19 “vaccines” would likely cause an uptick in HZ rate for recipients.

“An association of HZ with COVID-19 vaccination has been reported worldwide in case reports and case series, as well as in a retrospective study focusing on the safety of BNT162b2 [the EUA version of the Pfizer “vaccine”],” the authors write. “The latter found a risk ratio (RR) of 1.43 based on 15.8 events of HZ per 100[,]000 patients.” They add that “Iwanaga et al. published a narrative review on 399 patients who developed shingles after COVID-19 vaccination including two cases of oral HZ.”

Note: Patients who took the COVID-19 “vaccine” were 1.8 times as likely to develop HZ versus “unvaccinated” people. Image: Maritz et al. / JEADV

“Consistent with the hypothesis, a higher incidence of HZ was statistically detectable post-COVID-19 vaccine,” the authors write in their conclusion, adding that “the eruption of HZ may be a rare adverse drug reaction to COVID-19 vaccines. Even though the molecular basis of VZV [that is, varicella-zoster virus, which causes chickenpox, and the activation of HZ] reactivation remains murky, temporary compromising of VZV-specific T-cell-mediated immunity may play a mechanistic role in post-vaccination pathogenesis of HZ.

The authors even highlight the fact that “VZV reactivation is a well-established phenomenon both with infections and with other vaccines (i.e. this adverse event is not COVID-19-specific).”

For those unfamiliar, HZ (or shingles) is often contracted in childhood and emerges as a maculopapular rash. The diseases typically presents as a painful unilateral skin or mucous rash consisting of confluent erosions following the formation of vesicles. (See image at top.)


Feature image: Wikimedia / Creative Commons

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